【Hong Kong Magazine】LIN WEI-LUN & WANG CHENG-YANG 未來電影日 x 青春未來影展

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Curators of the Film Festival

(下見中文)

Summer is a season to sweat and feel young. Having kicked off the “Youth” series film festival in the summer of 2010, Museum of Contemporary Art (MOCA) Taipei welcomes this summer with more local independent films.  The festival curator for the past four years, Huang Mi-lu, introduced the duo of Future Film Day, Lin Wei-lun and Wang Cheng-yang, to MOCA Taipei and passed them the torch for the fifth year.

In Youth Way-Light Film Festival, thirty-seven films, documentaries and animations were selected and categorised into various topics upon three dots in a timeline – yesterday, today and tomorrow. From life to death, from encounter to departure, the topics stem from a lifespan of an individual and expand to the history of a versatile society we all live in. This year’s theme follows the tradition of “Youth”. The pronounciation of “Way-Light” is very close to the word “future” in Mandarin which implies we are in the present moment to recall the fond memories of the youth and to look forward in the days to come; it also echoes the name of the film day organised by Lin and Wang in the past three years.

Lin came up with the film day idea during his time in Japan working for the World Earth Day’s screening. He was shocked yet disappointed to find that Taiwan was missing in the two-hour compilation with contributions by people from over 120 countries. The missing link was indeed a passageway to the world.  “I am certain that Taiwan has many talents and quality productions. Because of my experience and network studying and working in Japan, it felt right to build this bridge when I came back home.” Lin ascertains.

Before the Youth series by MOCA Taipei and Huang Mi-lu, there were only red-carpet film festivals for celebrities and film contests for students. Some alternative choices were less attentive to Taiwanese productions. The sandwich class was ignored. Wang Cheng-yang explains, “It is also the flip side of our cultural policy to encourage localisation, rooting us deeper to the island. Future Film Day promotes quality works of Taiwanese filmmakers and animators to local audience as well as people from all over the world. In return, both audience and creators have opportunities to broaden their horizons through the exchange. And we don’t do one-off.” The Taichung duo organised the film day three years ago, once every quarter and gradually expanded to Taipei and Tainan.

The festival screening concurrently presents inside and outside MOCA Taipei as well as public and commercial places in Taipei and Taichung. Apart from enough talks and sharing sessions, there are special screenings from Kyoto and Macau. This is a usual practice of Future Film Day who have held screenings in an office, a hair salon, a café, a deserted building, a live house, a classroom, a parking lot, etc. “We say no to cinema because we want to create a different watching experience in relation to our living spaces and architecture.” says Wang.

By collaborating with MOCA Taipei, Future Film Day has gained creditability and some financial support for the first time. At the same time, they have had to give up its principle of charging an admission fee. Wang, a bit agitated at this point, says “Buying a ticket is a form of respect to creators and those putting all these together. Quality was never compromised even when we funded everything from our own pockets. We keep our standard in film selection and even trailer production. We have invited reputable directors and scholars from Japan, Singapore and Macau in respective genres to be our consulting and judging panels. Through this collaboration, we understand the organiser’s concern about charging a fee. If we can participate for another year, I really hope to impose an admission fee.”

Lin also shares room for improvement, “I hope the festival can expand to more cities within and beyond Taiwan. If budget allows, we can develop online gadgets for seat reservation and ticket purchase.”

夏天是屬於流汗和感覺年青的季節。自2010年開始,台北當代藝術館(MOCA)開始舉辦〈青春〉系列影展,今年也不例外,繼續以更多獨立電影迎接暑假。踏入第五年,過去四年的青春影展策展人黃米露為MOCA介紹了〈未來電影日〉兩位策展人林瑋倫及王政揚,撮合新合作並成功交棒。

今年〈青春未來影展〉的精選名單共有三十七齣電影、紀錄片和動畫,策展團隊特意把它們分佈在時間軸不同題材的三點——昨天、今天、明天,從生到死,從相遇到分離,電影合輯成個體的一生之於社會的多面向變化。影展主題仍跟隨過往的傳統,以「青春」開首配搭「未來」,一是回憶青春與嚮往未來之間是當下可以做的事;二是呼應策展團隊的名稱。

林瑋倫和王政揚於三年前舉辦〈未來電影日〉,這個想法是林氏早年在日本工作觀察得來;他有次為地球世界日籌備影片播放,卻發現全球逾一百二十多個國家的短片合起來兩個多小時的影片中,竟然沒有台灣代表。他既驚訝且失望,卻信心爆棚地表示:「我相信台灣有這方面的人才和優秀的製作,只欠了一道台灣與世界接駁的橋樑;我在日本進修和工作一陣子,認識了相關的人,令我決心回國後要建立這個平台。」

在MOCA和黃米露舉辦〈青春〉系列影展前,台灣有紅地氈式的電影節或專供學生參與的公開比賽,兩者中間可能還有另類選擇卻不盡推動本土製作,總的來說出現了斷層。王氏認為是政策令創作人太着重本土性,往往缺乏國際視野:「我們不但推廣在地優秀的作品和創作人給本土觀眾認識,更會把它/他們帶出台灣,觀眾和創作人相向交流是很珍貴的經驗,讓彼此視野更廣。而且我們不想做一兩次就了事。」來自台中的林氏和王氏大概三年前首次舉辦電影日,然後每三個月舉行一天播映,更擴展至台北及台南。

影展同步於MOCA內外、台北及台中的公共和商業空間舉行,附設許多的講座和分享活動,更有來自京都和澳門的特映環節。這也是〈未來電影日〉一貫的策展模式,他們曾在辦公室、髮型屋、咖啡室、廢棄建築、演出場地、教室、停車場等等進行放映,卻從不走入戲院。王氏解釋:「我們想在生活空間和建築中創造不同的看電影體驗。」

藉着這次與MOCA合作,〈未來電影日〉建立了公信力,也首次獲得資金籌辦影展,卻同時要放棄一個原則:收入場費。說到這點,王氏比較激動:「買門票是對創作人和籌備影展的人的一份尊重,雖然之前我們自掏腰包,做事卻從不馬馬虎虎,從選片到製作宣傳短片都保持水準,我們也會邀請日本、新加坡和澳門各片種的專家、學者和導演成為顧問和評審團。這次活動我們明白館方對收費的原則和限制,但如果明年再有機會參與的話,我希望觀眾會買票進場。」

林氏也分享了這次影展的改善地方:「我希望影展可伸延到台灣更多城市,以至海外更多合作伙伴;如果資源足夠,我們甚至可發展購票和訂座的網絡平台。」

This article would be edited and published in a.m. post, September edition.

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